Monday, November 7, 2016

Falcon - Self-Titled Album (2004)

[22 November 2016: This post is under heavy construction. I'll be adding more text, links, photos and correcting errors as time moves along. -P]

For a limited time I'm offering the eponymous first Falcon disc for free download. I'm down to my last few remaining copies of the second small pressing. Rather than letting it languish out of print and fade into obscurity, I'm making it available to fans old and new.  



Here's a link to the compressed .zip file - http://www.falconband.net/sounds/falcon.zip

Simply right-click on the link and "save link as". Then decompress once you've downloaded the .zip file.

Perry Grayson - Guitar/Vocals
Greg Lindstrom - Bass/Keyboard/Additional Lead Guitar on *
Darin McCloskey - Drums

Basic tracks recorded live in November 2003. A few overdubs and mixing conducted in February 2004. Engineered, mixed and mastered by Chris Kozlowski at the Polar Bear Lair in Middletown, Maryland. Produced by Falcon and Chris Kozlowski. Released May 24, 2004 on Liquid Flames Records, piece code LF002.

1. Downer (Grayson)
2. Castle Peak (Grayson)
3. On the Slab [guest lead vocals by Bobby Liebling from Pentagram] (Grayson)
4. The Crying of Lot 246 (Grayson)
5. Throwback (Grayson)
6. Redman [Bang cover] (D'Iorio, Ferrara & Gilcken)
7. High Speed Love (Lindstrom) *
8. Route 666 (Lindstrom)
9. Shelob's Lair (Lindstrom) *
10. Half Past Human (Lindstrom) *

The Eponymous Epic!


The self-titled Falcon album has to be my second fave recording experience of my career. Not only do I love it sonically, but I really dig everything about the project from start to finish. I don't use the term "project" to describe Falcon, though. It's a serious band situation.

Me and Greg L. flew out to Pennsylvania on November 19, 2003, for two days of wall-to-wall jamming at Pale Divine's rehearsal space (the Glen Mills, PA community center basement). Then we drove down to Maryland and hit the Polar Bear Lair studio for 5 more days. We banged out the basic tracks within two full days, followed by 3 more days of overdubs and mixing - a couple of guitar solos, vocals, percussion, etc. The result was a spontaneous, raw sounding album. We truly bashed it out as quick as humanly possible! A breath of fresh air compared to the recording sessions of Destiny's End - Breathe Deep the Dark.

Chris Kozlowski did an incredible job engineering and  Darin did a killer job behind the kit, despite the fact that we haven't had more than like 6 rehearsals with him! An especially huge thanks goes out to Greg Diener (guitarist/vocalist of Pale Divine) for loaning me his old Sunn Sceptre head for rehearsals. We returned to the Polar Bear Lair from February 18th to 21st to do a couple of last overdubs and to mix.

Greg, Darin & Perry inside Chris Kozlowski's Polar Bear Lair, Nov. 2003


Sunn Sceptre 60 watt head

For all you gear geeks (like me, Greg and Darin), I used my 1976 Les Paul Deluxe for all of the basic tracking and most of the solos. I brought my 1976 B.C. Rich Eagle Supreme on the February trip to lay down a couple of solos and to double-track some lead passages as well. Greg used his Fender USA Custom Shop Jazz Bass and his Les Paul Jr. (think vintage Leslie West) for his solos. Greg's keyboard parts on "Downer", "Lot 246" and "Half Past Human" was carried out on a Novation K-Station. Amp-wise I used Chris Kozlowski's original Sunn Model T for about 75% of the recording and an Orange Overdrive Series 2 (until it blew up) for overdubs.
Sunn Model T 120 watt head

Orange Overdrive Series 2 Head
Perry with his B.C. Rich Eagle Supreme & Marshall stack at the Artisan jam room, NoHo, CA - 2003 


The Story Behind the Cover

At first we wanted to keep with the Cirith Ungol tradition of using art depicting Michael Moorcock's albino elf anti-hero, Elric. We approached artist Robert Gould to see if we could license the cover of The Elric Saga Part I. It suited Falcon, as it depicted Elric with a bird of prey on his shoulder. At first Gould seemed interested, but eventually he just gave us the cold shoulder.

Ful color scan of Michael Moorcock's Elric of Melnibone by Robert Gould

Perry's b-day gig in '05 with Shakey Mallard & High Horse. Get your sushi 'n' rawk on!!

The S/T Nitzinger LP cover
It wound up better that way, as I discovered the perfect cover in a pen and ink piece by renowned fantasy artist Virgil Finlay. Finlay's illustration is of a skeletal warrior on a beach surrounded by seagulls. Being that I worked in graphic design/advertising, I chopped the skull out of the larger artwork, leaving the winged helmet in as well. The result was not only an album cover, but the perfect colophon/logo for Falcon. I quickly got in touch with Finlay's daughter through an old weird fiction friend, editor Joe Wrzos, to secure rights. From that point on the helmeted skull graced nearly every Falcon gig flyer. The final cover is a combination of Finlay's finest and a backdrop of black leather amp leather or Tolex and the logo in silver embossed foil stamping as on the self-titled Nitzinger LP (1972).


The infamous first Falcon gig flyer!

Track by Track Notes

1. Downer
This one isn't about popping pills. Quite the contrary, it's a philosophy. Taking things raw, without a crutch, heeding "the worse case scene". There's also a politically charged bent to the lyrics. The "banished utopia laid to waste before its time" serves the purpose of having a bite at Uncle Sam. Riff-wise, there's a little tidbit about the intro/outro worth mentioning. Rob Garven, the Cirith Ungol skinsman, said, upon receiving his copy of the S/T Falcon album, "It reminds me of Heart's 'Barracuda'. It wasn't a conscious effort. Just something that occurred by chance. I've always felt it owes more to Pentagram (circa Day of Reckoning) and Quartz (think Stand Up and Fight) than anything else. Greg played the honky tonk piano synth in the solo section of this one.

2. Castle Peak
Castle Peak is a mountain wedged between my old suburb (West Hills) and the ritzy gated community Bell Canyon in sunny Southern California. I hiked it many a time during my early teen trials and tribulations. Climbing Castle Peak cheered me up when I was down, prior to obtaining my very own electric axe. On the lower slopes of Castle Peak there's a cave, fondly referred to as the Bat Cave by the teenage heshers who used to hang out there. Castle Peak was used as a ceremonial site by the Chumash during the solstices, The Cave of Munits – which lies in direct sight of the rocky peak, was said to be the home of a powerful Chumash shaman who was killed after murdering the son of a chief. There are stone alcoves at the summit of Castle Peak. In and near the alcoves were heaps of of heavy rock 'n' metal graffiti. Back in my high school days (daze) there was spray-painted the likes of Iron Maiden, AC/DC and Metallica. Before these sprawling trails were officially preserved as parkland there was an overzealous security guard patrolling this parcel of land, formerly called Ahmanson Ranch. The rent-a-cop brandished a gun loaded with rock salt. Fortunately I was never caught by the guard, although I know others who were shot at and detained. All that nonsense came to a halt in 2004 when the Victory Trailhead, El Escorpion Park and the rest of the former Ahmanson land opened for public use. For once the politics of land/property development sided with the nature loving common person. I was stoked to the max and celebrated the cool situation with a trip to ye old Bat Cave.

Philip Parris Lynott - the original Rawker (1949-1986)
3. On the Slab
"On the Slab" is my tribute to Phil Lynott and Thin Lizzy. I'm heavily influenced by both the Eric Bell-era power trio and the classic lineup with the duelling guitars of Brian Robertson and Scott Gorham. They're a special band for Greg Lindstrom too. He and Cirith Ungol drummer Rob Garven used to wear homemade Thin Lizzy t-shirts on their rounds of SoCal record shops like my old hangout, Moby Disc in Canoga Park. The title stems from the story of the same name by Harlan Ellison. "On the Slab" was Ellison's paean to H.P. Lovecraft. This one's rooted in reality rather than fantasy. It's painfully obvious that this tune is a tale of a smack addict going down the drain on drugs. It could just as easily encompass blow and meth as well. (As in "inhaling your death off a slab".)

Bobby Liebling, the voice of Pentagram!
Ironically, "On the Slab" has guest lead vocals by none other than Pentagram's Bobby Liebling, himself a storied smack and crack addict for the majority of his life.

I originally laid down vocals on both the demo and album versions of the tune, but I just wasn't happy with the results. As the vocal tracking came to a close it was evident that I'd either need to revisit it or... The possibility of Bobby coming in to lend a hand - or pipes. Bobby previously made a guest spot on Pale Divine's Thunder Perfect Mind, on the tracks "20 Buck Spin" (a Penta-cover) and "Dark Knight". So, it goes without saying that both drummer Darin McCloskey and engineer Chris Kozlowski were friends of Bobby's already. At Chris' recommendation I left my lyrics sheet and a note to Bobby with my cell phone number. I didn't expect he'd want to sing it due to the too close-to-home theme. On the contrary, Bobby rang me up and raved about how authentically Lizzy-like the tune was and that he'd be very happy to vocalize a tribute to our and his big hero, Philo. Bobby rang me several times, even during the wee hours of the morning. He left me messages to show me how he wanted to sing parts. We had some good phone chatter. In the end, we were thrilled with Bobby's rendering. Bobby went off the rails again around the time we released the S/T Falcon CD. I called him and he nodded off on the phone. Hopefully he's doing better now than he was back in '04. To this day I’ve never met Bobby, but we had some good long talks on the phone, and I hope to see him live with Pentagram someday.

4. The Crying of Lot 246



The title of this one is a play on Thomas Pynchon's 1965 novel The Crying of Lot 49. Thematically it's slightly similar to "Castle Peak". "Lot 246" also has something in common with Grand Funk Railroad's "Save the Land". It's about conserving land, lashing out against greedy commercial/corporate property developers. Getting back to nature. That sort of thing... Both Greg Lindstrom and I are big fans of Cream, and the chord progression in the chorus of "Lot 246" brings to mind "Tales of Brave Ulysses". Chronologically, this one was the second track I wrote for Falcon - also the second I demoed with a drum machine in autumn 2002.









5. Throwback
For the most part, "Throwback" is just a let loose and have fun type of song. I still managed to inject some seriousness into the fray. The lines "They watch my heroes die / Public eye don't cry" imply that the media doesn't care about the passing of talented musicians. Like say Chuck Schuldiner of Death and Control Denied fame. Randy Palmer (Bedemon, Pentagram) is another that comes to mind. The rest of the lyrics deal with the uninitiated not understanding the world of heavy rock and metal. Claiming it's too loud and "evil" sounding. Let's not forget all that demonic imagery. When I sang "I'm a throwback, baby / Born too late," I was quoting from the Wino-era Saint Vitus classic. I dig stuff that people call dinosaur rock (say Pentagram again!), I let my freak flag fly (the hair is flowin'!) and I love playing through a blaring full Marshall stack. Another Pentagram-related lyric is "livin' in a ram!" (as in "Living in a Ram's Head").

Leisure Suit Perry in front of the guitar cab shed at the Polar Bear Lair, Nov. 2003


6. Redman [Bang cover]
Bang is one of my all-time fave early heavy '70s bands. I'd call them proto-metal because of that outright heaviness.. They had three albums out on Capitol Records between 1972 and 1974. This one was on the self-titled Bang LP (1972). My old pal Rob Preston (Doomed Planet Records) hipped me to Bang. And they were the first band I wrote about in the pages of Metal Maniacs when I became a staffer in 1999-2000. Not only did I interview drummer Tony D'Iorio, but I became friends with Frank Ferrara (bass/vocals) and Frankie Gilcken (guitar) as well. We hung out one night in Hollyweird in 2000 and also in the studio in 2002 while they were demoing new songs. After the studio visit we adjourned to their friend's Calabasas home. I love the hippie-esque theme of "Redman" - again, a cautionary tale of not allowing the land to be raped by the man and his penchant for war. Live, Falcon used to lengthen our version of "Redman" with an extended improv jam. Technically speaking, Bang tunes down a half-step (a semi-tone in the UK or Oz) to E-flat, while we tuned down a whole-step to D. This makes it easier on my voice and also adds a bit of heaviness to the whole affair.

7. High Speed Love
"High Speed Love" is an old Cirith Ungol tune from the late '70s. Greg wrote this fun little tune about fast cars. Both Greg and Rob Garven are big car racing fans. They love Ferraris and the like. I've never been much of a car geek, but I can understand their obsession with speedy automobiles. Tim Baker sang the original with backups by Rob and Greg.

8. Route 666
Another one of Greg's old Cirith Ungol songs which they demoed in the mid '70s. Greg wrote both the lyrics and music - and sang the original version himself. It's a horrific tale of a guy who comes face to face with a demon on a lonely desert highway. I had Greg's vocals to base my own delivery on thankfully.

9. Shelob's Lair
Fantasy geeks might realize right off the bat that this is Greg's take on J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings. Like Zeppelin, Rush and Mountain before them, Cirith Ungol used the hippie's fave fantasy series for song fodder. Shelob was the giant spider who tangled with the heroes of the story in Cirith Ungol. Cirith Ungol was the high mountain 'pass of the spider'. Other Tolkien bits Greg inserted into the lyrics were the Ringbearer (Frodo the Hobbit), Samwise (Frodo's Hobbit friend), the Nazgul (Ring wraiths) and the magic sword called Sting. A rehearsal recording sans vocals was my only guide in how to sing/play "Shelob's Lair". I tried to deliver the lines as Tim Baker (the CU vocalist) might have.

10. Half Past Human 

The subtitle of this one was "A Quarter to Ape". The final S/T Falcon track is Greg's tale of the demise of man on Earth. Cirith Ungol demoed it in the mid '70s. He was heavily influenced by the fantasies of Jack Vance (The Dying Earth) and perhaps a hint of Clark Ashton Smith's tales of Zothique as well. Again, I had no vocal guide to follow beyond Greg's coaching. I tried to instil a bit of Iggy Pop into the line "Thirteen screaming souls / to feed the one within". 






Saturday, August 11, 2012

Apologies

A quick post to say that I only meant and mean to stick to facts as I remember them when posting on the Falcon's Fortress. This especially pertains to Destiny's End content. It wasn't necessarily my intention to put people down, but sometimes situations and memories have provoked a strong response from me. I'm mainly referring to my old bandmates James Rivera and Nardo Andi, and Metal Blade Records personnel like Brian Slagel and Bill Metoyer. They have their own lives to lead, just as I have mine. There were cases when published interviews with other DE members damaged my reputation in the global heavy metal press, and there are rifts between members to a certain extent. I was young, not stupid. Drugs (no, not my usage) played a big role in the deterioration of DE. Then there's the relationship between the original DE members and our label. A label that claimed for years they owed the band publishing royalties and without following through on paying. This is nothing new when you start talking about band politics. I don't regret my decision to leave DE, and I've wanted to tell my side of the story for many years. This blog has allowed me to do just that. It took quite a while for me to feel comfortable sharing my reasons for bailing from DE in 2000. If my words portray people in a negative light, it's just how I remember things. Such as the absence of my picture from the Transition CD. That's just the tip of the iceberg in the scheme of things DE-related. On one hand I'm sorry about the negativity. On another it feels good to let out the truth as I experienced it. I guess this is a bit of an apology of sorts.

We are all fallible as human beings. I have tried to keep my nose as clean as possible in the chaotic roller coaster ride of the heavy rock and metal community. A few beers throughout the years to be social.

All the best,

P

Friday, June 1, 2012

In Memory: Michael D. Grant III

A sad day for metal, and a bad blow for me personally. Today I lost a close friend. And we lost a true talent, singer Michael D. Grant III, of Crescent Shield, passed away at 39. Mike’s melodic baritone voice graced pro recordings by Legend Maker, Onward and finally Crescent Shield. Sure, he was a singer, but he was also a gifted lyricist and songwriter. Even though he didn’t play an instrument, Mike would sing or hum guitar and bass lines or drum parts. His passion was music, particularly heavy metal. Acting was his other forte, and he brought that theatrical flair with him to whatever he sang, especially on stage. Acting out the lyrics with all sorts of motions and gestures! CS or “The Shield” was his true calling, the band he formed with comrade in arms Dan DeLucie before Destiny’s End folded. The pinnacle of Mike’s career was performing with “The Shield” at the Keep It True open air festival in Germany in 2008, and the footage is the proverbial proof in the pudding that heavy metal is missing one of its great frontmen.


MDG III and me at the Anaheim Destiny's End/Nevermore/Iced Earth tour gig - 5/14/99 


Personal memories? They’re many and far reaching.

I first met Mike Grant at the House of Blues in Hollywood at an Yngwie Malmsteen concert in late 1995. Mike had recently relocated to L.A. from Connecticut. I was wandering around outside the venue before the gig when I saw this dude wearing a Forbidden longsleeve. Though I was a lot more reserved back then, I went up to him and remarked that it was good to see someone flying the flag of such a killer technical/melodic and traditional metal band in those barren times. Mike instantly opened up, a super friendly guy, and we had a long chat about all sorts of favorite bands we had in common (Savatage, Sanctuary, Fates Warning, Queensyrche, etc.).

I then asked the question I’d been reserving for last, “So, do you play an instrument?”
“No, but I sing!” was Mike’s reply.

And he wasn’t lying—unlike the usual L.A. wannabes—I’d find out later. Mike’s instrument was his voice, and he used it to show instrumentalists what he heard in his head to orchestrate a song.

I didn’t get Mike’s number at the end of the Yngwie show, but we said we’d see each other at the next metal gig. And, rest assured we repeatedly did at nearly every club imaginable in the SoCal area. I kept badgering Mike about using his vocal services. At first for the band I was forming in 1996 with Mike Bear (bass), and later for my own project (Obscure), but somehow we never recorded a note together, nor played a gig in the same band. We shared the stage in different bands and watched each other perform countless times, egging a metal bro on from the front row. Oh, but we did jam many a time, off stage – in the rehearsal room or at home. It was during those many jams that I witnessed firsthand the enormous talent and larger than life personality that was “MDG III,” as he was referred to for short. The skill! A great pair of ears and pipes! Naturally precise pitch, emotionally charged delivery and a keen ear for what each instrument could accomplish towards the greater whole of a song.

While L.A. is a massive metropolis, and tons of superficial people abound, Mike was a no-bullshit type of guy you could depend on – never so self-absorbed that he forgot to ask you about your life. Always willing to help a friend in need! Mike was always struggling to make ends meet with “day jobs,” like any aspiring musician or actor in L.A. One of Mike’s many jobs was as a manager in a photocopy shop, where he pitched in to assist me in keeping my tiny publishing business (Tsathoggua Press) afloat by sneaking in free or heavily discounted jobs. He could’ve gotten the sack for it, but he went out of his way for a close friend.

Big city or not, L.A. actually has a very incestuous little metal scene, and the same fans and musicians are spotted from venue to venue. Everybody seems to know each other or has answered a “musicians wanted” ad placed by a friend’s band and so on. So, it wasn’t a big surprise in 1997, when I discovered that Mike Grant had become pals with New Eden guitarist Dan DeLucie and his sister Linda simultaneous to me, bassist Mike Bear and Prototype guitarist Kragen Lum. Friendships were solidified then that lasted – far beyond any of the stereotypical L.A. facade – for well over a decade. A close-knit circle of metal friends, a “metal posse” as Mike Grant’s cohort in “The Shield,” bassist Mel Sisneros, called it. MDG III was definitely one of the blazing personalities in that ring. He kept us amused by acting out all sorts of goofy scenarios on our various outings. It was rare that our Mr. Grant ever missed a chance to hang out with the whole group of metalheads. And for a good several years I probably saw MDG III at least once a week, despite the fact that he lived in the heart of L.A. proper, while I was on the western edge of the San Fernando Valley.

Mike, being of a thespian bent (he was a born actor, I tell ya!), was a total film fanatic. It was the second thing he loved after his metal. One of Mike’s many jobs was hawking promo tickets to advance screenings of new movies. He was always hooking his friends up with free passes, or accompanying them to theaters all over the “southland,” as the newcasters like to call El Lay. One of the funniest episodes of my friendship with Mike revolves around the flick Cube. We saw it near his old Miracle Mile pad at the Beverly Center. The premise of the movie revolved around a group of amnesiac people imprisoned within a booby-trapped maze, rigged up with all sorts of treacherous contraptions to slay its human occupants. None of the prisoners knew why they were ensnared or how to exit the cube of the flick title. Mike and I followed the arrows and signs, exited the mall to the multi-storey garage. We headed straight for the level and section where he’d parked his little black Honda. Only to find the bloody car was missing. We proceeded to check every level of the garage, but... No cigar! Figuring the thing was stolen, we headed back into the mall to flag down security, only to both smack ourselves in the head for our own mistake. We discovered that the flick had put our noggins in such a spin that we neglected to realize there were two garage towers on opposite sides of the mall. Go figure! The movie had achieved its desired mind-fuck, and we laughed our asses off the entire way back to Mike’s place.

I mentioned jamming together... It was my pleasure to play heavy-ass metal with good pal Mike for nearly a couple of years, between 1998 and 2000. You see, our singer in Destiny’s End lived in Texas, while we four instrumentalists were in La La Land. Mike not only loaned us his stereo power amp the few times that our singer was actually in town, but... He also sang for Destiny’s End during, by my estimate, upwards of 100 rehearsals. Reason being? We wanted to be well-rehearsed with a vocalist for gigs. Also, guitarist Dan DeLucie and I wanted to give Mike a chance to keep his voice in shape for his own efforts. In Destiny’s End rehearsals Mike fit like a glove, and I honestly felt like he was a member of the band. As I’ve stated previously here, there were many times when I wished he had been our DE singer. He was honest, dependable, down-to-earth and always enthusiastic about his beloved metal.

There were other jams, though! A metal family consisting of me, Mike Bear (then in Prototype), Ana Greco (then in Rapture and Faustus) and Mike Grant (then in Ocean Seven) often fooled around with tunes on our time off from rehearsing with our respective bands. Mike cracked us up by mouthing what he felt was the most clich√© riff from his first-ever band back in CT (Morpheus), forcing us to play it. I’ll remember that silly ditty till the day I die, I think, thanks to Mike’s antics.

On a couple of occasions, I loaned Mike (and Dan DeLucie) the use of my multi-effect unit to put delay and reverb on his voice for Onward or early Crescent Shield demos. I was the first person outside of Dan who heard the demo of “The Waterfall Enchantress,” and it just floored me. The hairs on my arms were standing on end. Mike had succeeded in transforming what was previously just Toby Knapp's instrumental metal track (Onward had no identity yet) into a riveting and heart-rending journey. You could sense he felt every last line he sang. No going through the motions for Mike!

Though Mike and I hadn’t seen each other in a while (we last hung on my second to last L.A. visit in April ’09), we kept in touch online. In our last chat he seemed to upbeat, coming out of the gloomy aftermath of his long-time girlfriend Sue Lee’s untimely death in 2011. We spoke about working on something musically together in the near future. He asked me to email our mutual pal Dan DeLucie to get the ball rolling. I’m crushed to say that’ll never happen. I’m left pondering what sort of metal magic that triumvirate could’ve wrought.

I suppose I’ve got to close this out. I have a wealth of fond memories of hanging out with Mike, which is a small consolation for not being able to grow old with him. To be old farts singing classic metal tunes on the fogy farm! I speak for all of Michael D. Grant III's friends, when I say “Rest in peace brother! You’ll always be on our minds…”

Crank up some Onward and Crescent Shield Mike's honor, and when you’re done with that, spin some Savatage, Fates Warning and Sanctuary! I know he would’ve liked that…





Monday, May 21, 2012

Visual Evidence of Pale Divine at DSR III - "Amplified"


Here's some video footage of me bangin' the bass for Pennsylvania-based heavy doom rawkers Pale Divine at the Doom Shall Rise III festival in Goeppingen, Germany (April 16, 2005)! The tune's called "Amplified," off Thunder Perfect Mind, the first PD album. Cheers to Darin McCloskey (also my drummer in Falcon) and Greg Diener for the opportunity to tour with one of my all-time fave bands!!




Thursday, May 17, 2012

Chuck Schuldiner - 45th Birthday Interview

A day after what would have been Chuck Schuldiner's 45th birthday (April 13th!), I was interviewed by Freethought Radio's Alex Fidel, as part of his celebration of all things Chuck, Death and Control Denied. We talked about my articles "Precious Memories of Chuck Schuldiner" and "Things Seemed So Eternal: 12 Years of Infernal Death," meeting up with Chuck, Death and Hammerfall in Dec. 1999 and the state of heavy metal on mainstream radio. You can download the entire Chuck Schuldiner 45th Birthday episode by clicking here. Or, you can cut to the chase, and download the short MP3 of my intie alone by right cicking here and selecting "save as."

Chuck Schuldiner - live at the Whisky in Hollywood, CA - 1/16/92


Sporting a Death - Symbolic logo shirt while opening for Mercyful Fate, Aug. 1999 

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

Worlds of Weird Site

Blogging is all the rage it seems... I've co-founded a new blog-style site called Worlds of Weird with my former Destiny's End dual-axe team partner Dan DeLucie. Our focus is horror, fantasy and mystery/crime fiction and true crime in all their forms (books, magazines, TV, film, comics, online, etc.). Be sure to check it out, folks!

Thursday, September 1, 2011

August 2011 Freethought Interview RE: Chuck Schuldiner

James Copper of Death in HD posted Alex Fidel's Freethought Radio interview with me on YouTube. Check it out below or click here to go to directly to the video page. The intie focused on all things related to Death, Control Denied and Chuck Schuldiner, including my liner notes to the forthcoming reissue of Death's Individual Thought Patterns.